Manhattan

Neighborhoods

Oh won’t you be my neighbor?

Washington Heights

From Columbia


Groundbreaking for the subway took place at 157th Street in 1900, and the line was completed by 1906. A subsequent construction boom brought stately apartment buildings and tenements, attracting Irish, Greek, and Jewish New Yorkers.

The Audubon Ballroom was popular for performances.

The Irish in Washington Heights

Morningside Heights

Morningside Heights is the location of the new Columbia University Campus. It not far west of Harlem. The neighborhood has been improving steadily since the Bloomingdale insane asylum built 1816 has been replaced by the new Columbia University campus and the Cathedral of Saint John the Divine. The neighborhood is a middle class neighborhood with modern middle class apartments replacing many of the old rowhouses and brownstones.

Battery Park City

In Southwest Lower Manhattan the area around this “City” was the Greek quarter, with St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church as one of the largest congregations in the neighborhood. The building was built 1832, and the congregation founded 1916 by Greek immigrants.

The Five Point District

Throughout the 1800s the Five Points was one of the major neighborhoods for criminals, and conditions were such that some people estimated over 1000 people living in single tenement buildings. Gangs roamed the streets, and disease was rampant.

After the turn of the century, many of the tenements and factories in the west of the neighborhood were torn down and replaced with government buildings, whereas in the east most of the buildings remain.

Chinatown

The Chinese immigrants lived in China town since the 1840s and 50s. However, there was a distinct lack of Chinese women. Opium dens, prostitution, and salves flourished. Some of the population established a 1920s Chinese farmer’s market.

Harlem

Harlem was neighborhood in transition. For a map. The area was still in some ways a slum, but much of the area had an improved standard of living and clubs, dance halls, speakeasies, and churches are common. source Map of Churches. Blacks were moving in to the lower areas.

The Lower East Side

Jews had begun leaving the lower east side at the beginning of the decade.

Manhattan

Water Water Everywhere, but not a Drop of Drink OrcsDontSurf